What Does Ernest Flagler-Mitchell D*** Pic Say About Black Men?

Its been almost a month since LaKaya Sinclair came forward to disclose former NAACP president and Monroe County Legislator Ernest Flagler-Mitchell sent a photo of his genitals. Since that time, NAACP removed him as the local president, he deactivated his personal Facebook page and his possible re-election campaign has gone radio silent. Did Flagler-Mitchell lose it all in an attempt to showcase the size of his penis? What would drive a man that is mentally sound, somewhat successful, and supposedly God-fearing, to stoop so low? I’m sure Christians would say, “the devil made him do it.”But, what if that is just who he is? Do not get me wrong, Ernest has always been respectful to me, even during some questionable moments. However, one cannot deviate from the thoughts of what contributes to this behavior, and should it be normalized or demonized?



Over the years, I have sat down with various rappers and asked the question, "has rap music destroyed the Black community?" Could decades of listening to over-sexualized music that promotes one night stands, large penises, big butts, side-pieces, and casual sex be the culprit? Rapper Fabolous has received his fair share of criticism since he was accused of domestic violence. Now, he appears to be on a path of redemption and seems to confirm my theory. He posted the following on Instagram, "I know the cool of this generation is being savage & not giving a fuck.. And all the rap songs say money over everything & everybody is sleeping wit somebody else’s man or woman. But fa real.. having a partner to love, share life with, raise a family together with, & make each other better is real GOALS.

“That’s the real COOL. That’s really WINNING!! Love You @emilyb_.”



Another perspective in an article published by NY Times Magazine in 2016 could suggest something vastly different. The article entitled “Last Taboo: Why Pop Culture Just Can’t Deal With Black Male Sexuality” by Wesley Morris states, “Women have long been asked to take off their clothes, out of both artistic necessity and rank gratuitousness. Isn’t it men’s turn? Even when the nudity veers into homophobia (and boy, can it), there is an “at last” quality to all of this bareness: It’s so matter-of-fact, so casual. (We’re not, to be clear, talking about erections; there’s still a line between a flaccid, out-of-focus penis attached to what’s probably a stunt double on “The Affair” and, say, a European troublemaker like Gaspar Noé filming aroused, ejaculating ones.) We’ve gotten more gender-neutral, more feminist, more comfortable with our various bodies, more used to seeing dudes in gym locker rooms, better at Instagram and Snapchat and Tumblr — and so, too, have we gotten more O.K. with penises. Some penises, anyway. A vast majority of these penises are funny, casual, unserious. Their unceremonious appearance — as naturalism, comedy, symbolism, provocation — is new, and maybe progressive. But that progress is exclusive, because these penises almost always belong to white men. As commonplace as it has recently become to see black men on television and at the heart of films, and as normal as it’s becoming to see male nudity in general, it has been a lot more difficult to see those two changes expressed in the same body. A black penis, even the idea of one, is still too disturbingly bound up in how America sees — or refuses to see — itself.”


Does the article suggest, mainstream America is purposely hiding the penis of Black men due to fear of it becoming normalized? Could this idea somehow play a role in the eagerness of some Black men willing to put their penises on full display, no matter how successful they may be? The idea that some men will lose it all for a snapshot of their oversized or undersized man parts seems disappointing, but should it be?

139 views1 comment